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March 25, 2014

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allotmentmum

Thanks for the reminder - must do some mulching. If only I'd bothered stirring the compost, I might actually have some!

Fiberon

Very interesting.

I never realised that Mulch was actually compost?

I always thought that mulch was a totally separate organic product.

I have never really utilised compost and have been advised many times to use it - I think this year I will experiment and see if my garden improves.

Dawn

Allotment mum - you and me both. I never get mine turned often enough which is why I often ship in my compost.

Fiberon - mulch refers to the job it does- i.e. a layer of material laid on top of the soil - so it could be bark chippings, pebbles, or many different things, but a good organic compost (such as a spent mushroom compost) is by far the best thing to use in my opinion. And well rotted garden compost is also a useful one.

Esther Montgomery

This isn't exactly about mulch but you might know what to advise. I've some very good, home-made compost. If I lay it on the surface around plants which could do with a tonic but wouldn't like to be disturbed . . will rain and watering take the goodness down to them or will the sun bleach it away and make the black, hard blobs it turns it into (if left on the surface neat) simply unsightly instead of useful?

Dawn

Hi Esther - rain can indeed dissolve some of the nutrients out of the compost and yes, they will then be going into the soil in a soluble form which will make it easy for plants to absorb. And no - I don't think the sun will bleach anything away. Also, hopefully, come the autumn, when things get wetter, the hard lumps should soften which would make them easier for the worms to then incorporate the organic matter into the soil which will improve its structure. See - it's win, win, win!

Esther Montgomery

Thanks - compost ready in wheel barrow. Will start spreading. (Makes me feel a bit like a farmer!)

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